Film directing laboratory

Lecturer: Miki Polonski

The course is conceived as a film directing laboratory for second and third-year students.

By doing practical directing exercises and creating short films, but also through lectures, watching films and class discussions, the students will be exposed to the cinematic universe that surrounds them. During the year we will be gradually expanding our search within the cinematic language. By passing through the light that accompanies every moment in the frame, we will seek to feel the density and the constant movement of time. An important part of our process will be to explore cinematic time and to try to give it a meaning, baring it to a sensory experience. Within this process we will strive to discover the cinematic image, its effect on the pulse of the film and the people hiding within it.

The film that students will submit at the end of the process will come from an in-depth journey into their life experience and it will focus on the moment of their encounter with the art of cinema.

To paraphrase Robert Bresson saying: “Not to shoot a film in order to illustrate a thesis, or to display men and women confined to their external aspect, but to discover the matter they are made of. To attain that "heart of the heart" which does not let itself be caught either by poetry, or by philosophy or by drama.”

 

Film directing laboratory

Lecturer: Miki Polonski

Semester: annual
Credits: 3

A journey into cinema through the gaze of 15 directors

Lecturer: Miki Polonski

The gaze of the directors whose work we will watch in the classroom largely shaped the face of the cinema I believe in. They made us get closer to each other and they felt the vulnerability of our minds and bodies. During the course we will get to know each of them in depth and listen to their uncompromising voice as it emanates from the most meaningful gesture they could have left.  A film. 

 

 

A journey into cinema through the gaze of 15 directors

Lecturer: Miki Polonski

Semester: annual
Credits: 2

The Journeys to Immediate Surroundings

Lecturer: Lea Mauas

Seminar with Salamanca group, artists, and guest lecturers.

 In the seminar, we will get to know artists, groups, and figures who develop artistic projects outside of the conventional art venues. We will go out into the public sphere, intervene in it, act in it, try to push the boundaries of ourselves, of SVT, and of our discipline. At the same time, we will read texts, meet artists and figures who will shed a different light on the topics explored in the course, and try to challenge ourselves in the different exercises by addressing social, political, economic, or spatial realities in which they take place. A journey in the city in which we live and work.

 

The Journeys to Immediate Surroundings

Lecturer: Lea Mauas

Semester: annual
TUE. 10:00-13:00
Credits: 3

Physical Studio

Lecturer: Maya Levy

The course allows comprehensive studio work for students who wish to dive into the connections between physical body and mind. Body based work that addresses creative and performative processes. In the second semester, the sessions will open for presentation of individual project that will be the focus of sessions.

The course is open only to students who have completed the fundamental course with Levi.

 

Physical Studio

Lecturer: Maya Levy

Semester: annual
every two weeks (11 sessions) 10:00-13:00
Credits: 1.5

Plastic Art

Lecturer: Sagit Mezamer

Drawing and extension of drawing into actions, into objects and various materials. We will work on an expansion of images, wondering practice, and further experience working on more complex installations, drawing installations, video installations and docu-installations, and more. The class is based on weekly assignments, lectures, and group format discussions.

 

Plastic Art

Lecturer: Sagit Mezamer

Semester: annual
SUN. 17:30-20:30
Credits: 3

Symposium “What For?” Four Questions About the Creative Act

Lecturer: Menahem Goldenberg

The paradox of the creative act: art as perspective/self-expression (creativity) has taken over reality, and in reality where everyone is an artist (personal) and everything is art (private), the “common world” no longer exists. We will find that art, which in essence works towards reality and the other, leads to its own cancellation.

In the course, we will discuss four fundamental issues surrounding various texts that address the “problematics” of the creative act in general and in the contemporary context in particular.

  • Snapshot – the aesthetic age

(Benjamin, Experience and Poverty; Bruno Latour – We Have Never Been Modern)

  • The role of art – to be human, to be contemporary, to be political

 (Courbet’s Realist Manifesto; Kant, Critique of Judgment)

  • The artistic product – imitation, indifference, theatricality, autonomy (Schelling, The System of Transcendental Idealism; Graham Harman, Object and Art)
  • Action beyond human: for the strange and terrifying

(Graham Harman, On the Horror of Phenomenology; Iain Hamilton Grant, Being and Slime: The Mathematics of Protoplasm in Lorenz Oken’s ‘Physio-Philosophy’)

 

Symposium “What For?” Four Questions About the Creative Act

Lecturer: Menahem Goldenberg

Semester: annual
MON. 15:00-16:30
Credits: 1.5

Advanced Philosophy: Origin of Thought

Lecturer: Menahem Goldenberg

Deleuze said the philosophy begins with a scream. Sometimes it is a quiet, small scream. For example, Leibniz’s scream: “Why is there something rather than nothing?” And from the open mouths that seem to try and suck the entire world in, concepts and methods emanate and formulate. In the course, we will try to listen to some of these screams, and look at some ideas about the origin of (creative) thought, and probably scream at each other for a bit.

What is Philosophy? About thought, love, and friendship

Beyond-experience (Metaphysics) – Plato: The Divided Line Parable; Aristotle, ethics.

Presence and representation – Heidegger, The Age of the World Picture.

Human sciences (Psychology): Consciousness and Mind – Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature.

The relationship between thought and reality: Transcendental Idealism - Kant, The Critique of Pure Reason.

Existence and Reality (Aesthetics-Phenomenology-Existentialism) – Kant, Critique of Judgment.

Advanced Philosophy: Origin of Thought

Lecturer: Menahem Goldenberg

Semester: annual
WED. 17:00-19:00
Credits: 2

4th year -Guest Workshops

Lecturer:

1st semester – 15 sessions guest lectures 2nd semester – sessions with school faculty.

4th year -Guest Workshops

Lecturer:

Semester: annual
MON. 15:30-21:30
Credits: 3

More Images Less Talk

Lecturer: Yuval Rimon

More Images Less Talk

Lecturer: Yuval Rimon

Semester: annual
Sunday 9:00-12:00
Credits: 3

Visual Art Project

Lecturer: Yuval Rimon

 Collaborative artistic work created by all group members, according to their skills and willingness to contribute to the creative process.

 

Visual Art Project

Lecturer: Yuval Rimon

Semester: annual
Wedensday 09:00-12:30
Credits: 3

Plastic Art studio

Lecturer: Naama Arad


The course will focus on the relationship between man and object through making and experiencing artworks. We will be looking to explore the various ways in which these relationships are constituted and the ways in which they affect our relations to our surroundings. The starting point of the course will consider man as an “activator” of art works, either as a maker or as a viewer. In this regard, we will think of the works we make as performative objects - as they actively set a process in motion rather than represent an end. The course will expose students to physical, visual and textual materials and will be based on exercises and presentations. As the year progresses, we will be looking to expand our gaze, from the body towards the object and beyond it, into the exhibition space.

Plastic Art studio

Lecturer: Naama Arad

Semester: annual
SUN. 16:30-19:30
Credits: 3

Toolbox – Professional training in the workshop

Lecturer: Carmel Bar

Toolbox – Professional training in the workshop

Lecturer: Carmel Bar

Semester: annual
TUES. 16:00-20:00
Credits: 2

Variations: Introduction to creation with sound in Ableton Live

Lecturer: Lior Pinski

Variations: Introduction to creation with sound. This course is intended to impart the basic skills of audio recording and editing alongside experimenting with compositions using recorded materials. The main software we will be working on in this course is Ableton Live, which will allow us a flexible and creative approach to sound editing and processing. The course will begin with a sine wave drawing on a whiteboard alongside the question "What is a sound wave?" And we will end with the deep and beautiful audio works you will create. In between, we will learn about digital audio and become familiar with the digital versions of the basic and central sound processing devices. The course will take a look at the history of recording-based music and reflect on the theory behind such compositions.

 

 

Variations: Introduction to creation with sound in Ableton Live

Lecturer: Lior Pinski

Semester: a
MON. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 1.5

Morning Space- Yoga

Lecturer: Michal Harada

Throughout the academic year, 2 “morning spaces” will be held each week between 09:00-09:50.

Morning Space- Yoga

Lecturer: Michal Harada

Semester: annual
TUSES. & THURS. 09:00-09:50
Credits: 1

Movement – Action

Lecturer: Shelly Palmon

The texts of movement, which are familiar to our bodies, ready to be retrieved, hold the most foundations of our movement development. How we learned to walk, how we learned to desire and approach, to approach the object of desire.
The class wishes to awaken the attention to what is assimilated in the body and exists in and it every day, to what is assimilated as a forgotten possibility and from this to where movement can continue to expand. In this process, the students are directed to pay attention to the place, the different relationships in the space, and other variables.

Movement – Action

Lecturer: Shelly Palmon

Semester: annual
SUN. 09:00-12:00
Credits: 3

Visions Theatre – advanced

Lecturer: Amit Drori

The course will focus on developing creative processes and formulating a visual language: a puppet, an object, a world of images, design, technique and aesthetic language. The course will examine the connection between the personal and cultural spheres in the development of a personal and unique artistic language.
Using exercises, individual work, and group discussions we will explore the transformation of content through a world of images. We will take on thematic development, formulating a research question, examine the transition from the personal sources of the artwork to universal contexts, and their expression in the language of action, dramaturgy mapping, visual imagery, and the formulation of coherence in working with multiple parameters.

Visions Theatre – advanced

Lecturer: Amit Drori

Semester: annual
THURS. 17:30-20:30
Credits: 3

Introduction to Puppet Theatre

Lecturer: Amit Drori

An introductory course that defines the basics of puppet theatre operating, directing and thinking. The course will examine operating characteristics and forms of expression generated by diverse techniques, and will focus on defining fundamental tools in the work process. Developing the level of attention, concentration, and awareness in the initial transition from operator to the puppet through breathing and touch. Later on, the course will focus on directing exercises through which we will analyze the components of the medium, the situations resulting from the encounter between different mediums in puppet theatre, and expanding the group’s discourse and analysis skills.

Introduction to Puppet Theatre

Lecturer: Amit Drori

Semester: b
MON. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 3

Lighting for Contemporary Performance

Lecturer: Omer Shizaf

Contemporary performance requires a different approach to stage means: it needs a reinterpretation of the scenographic principles and an examination of existing methodologies. In the course we will learn to recognize light as an artistic means and formulate an applied technique for lighting design, one that is based on the concrete space and the concept of setting. We will introduce possibilities for working with lighting in the early stages of an artistic process, which establish organic relations between lighting and the other components of the artwork. Through experimentation and practical work, we will get to know the means of light available to us, the computer and the lighting system. We will examine how to address the process and mechanisms of lighting in the performance and develop the ability to talk about them.

Lighting for Contemporary Performance

Lecturer: Omer Shizaf

Semester: annual
TUES. 10:00-13:00
Credits: 3

Noise Material Silence Duration: intro to sound based art

Lecturer: Tomer Damsky

The course explores sound as raw material, tool, and artistic language. We will learn about the axis between the perception of sound as what shapes space and time, and sound art practices and their encounter with image and stage. We will meander between scientific-philosophical-artistic theories, developing sonor curiosity and skilled listening, get to know multidisciplinary works in which sound plays a central role, technical learning of the mystery of the cable and secrets of button pushing, performative exercises and experiments in sound and space. We will get to know artists, techniques and devices that have changed the way we perceive and experience sound and experience sound-based work

Noise Material Silence Duration: intro to sound based art

Lecturer: Tomer Damsky

Semester: annual
MON. 16:30-19:30
Credits: 2.5

Drawing

Lecturer: Alex Kremer

Drawing and painting class. The course will be based on drawing from observation with excursions to the language of abstract drawing. Alongside the universal formal rules of 2D art, the course will also focus on the student’s individual development.
Thematic framework: portrait-figure, figure in space, live model, landscape, etc.
Techniques: charcoal, pencil, pastels, ink, watercolor, tempera and experimental techniques.
The students will present their work as part of the course throughout the school.

Drawing

Lecturer: Alex Kremer

Semester: annual
TUES. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 3

Voice – Advanced

Lecturer: Ruth Vider Magen

Group work building on the previous year at the beginners’ Voice Course.


Voice – Advanced

Lecturer: Ruth Vider Magen

Semester: a
MON. 12:30-14:30
Credits: 2

Voice – Beginners

Lecturer: Ruth Vider Magen

How does the voice formulate stage language through song, text, and space?
Learning the basics of voice training. The physical body as an instrument that has frequency and the ability to be aware of voice frequencies in the body. Enriching and expanding the correlation between the body and its voice frequencies. Developing awareness of the structure of the body and its effect on voice. Getting to know the phenomenon of echo and resonance. Body and space, how the voice lives and feels the space, the voice as a means to sculpt a space. The link between the voice and the world of feelings, emotion, and image. Expanding the range of voice expression. Developing the connection between listening and voice. Voice and performer. Language as the definition of space, learning language as living frequencies that move through body and space. Learning through gibberish. Text as a stage voice experience. Creating through singing.

Voice – Beginners

Lecturer: Ruth Vider Magen

Semester: a
TUES. 10:00-12:00
Credits: 2

Stills Photography – Photographic Frame as a Means of Expression

Lecturer: Amit Mann

In the course, we will gain an in-depth understanding of the camera and the various ways to use it and the genre of photography as a means of expression. The course will include practical work and critique. Comprehensive familiarity with the genre through still photographers and filmmakers, artist’s talks, and visits to exhibitions and print houses. The course’s objective is to provide an additional means of expression.

Stills Photography – Photographic Frame as a Means of Expression

Lecturer: Amit Mann

Semester: annual
THURS. 14:00-16:30
Credits: 2

Performance: History and Theory

Lecturer: Atalya Nevo Israeli

In the second half of the 20th century there was a "performative turn" in art and art theory. At its center we find performance as an art event in its own right, in which the performative aspects are the artistic focus and main object of attention, blurring the line between mediums, art and life, performer and viewer. In the course, we will discuss conceptual and practical aspects – cultural, economic, political and philosophical – that shape this phenomenon through texts as well as works of prominent performance artists. Throughout the academic year, the students will be asked to complete theoretical and practical tasks. Assignments and full attendance are prerequisites for completing the course.

Performance: History and Theory

Lecturer: Atalya Nevo Israeli

Semester: annual
TUES. 17:00-18:30
Credits: 1.5

Short Film

Lecturer: Eitan Buganim

The advanced video course is based on a series of theoretical experiments and practical exercises that examine the gap and tension between video art and film.
The course follows two parallel arcs that dialectically undermine one another: instilling the skill of a discerning viewer and creating video works as an artist and as an individual, against the profound understanding and the ability to recreate the emotional and intuitive ties that underpin the artistic action.
The course is divided into units of 3-4 lessons, each will center around pairs of contrasting concepts from the language of the moving image. We will watch examples, experiment with real time actions, and try to refute prejudices and understand the importance of the large gray area between the two extremes that concern the structure, perception and failures of language.

Short Film

Lecturer: Eitan Buganim

Semester: annual
SUN. 13:00-16:00
Credits: 3

Acting Class – Advanced

Lecturer: Haim Abramsky

The class expands on the subjects that we addressed in the first year, in the desire to further develop and hon the actor's craft: training in techniques of emotional expression, understanding texts, and relating to different types of actions and character work.
The advanced class will include work on texts and acting for the camera exercises. The camera requires a different kind of concentration than the stage – one that is more minimalist and internal. The class will focus mainly on acting for the stage, while the exercises for the camera will provide a glimpse into a slightly different type of acting and look at the difference between stage acting and screen acting.

Acting Class – Advanced

Lecturer: Haim Abramsky

Semester: annual
THURS. 14:00-17:00
Credits: 3

Acting

Lecturer: Haim Abramsky

An acting class that offers improvisation techniques aimed at expanding the actor’s physical and emotional toolbox. The class focuses on three aspects: 1. Examining the dynamics between partners on stage. Working on listening, initiating, and responding in real time to create dramatic tension and relationships. 2. Expanding the actor’s inner world. Exercises aimed at elaborating personal means of expression and searching for different sides in the actor. 3. Looking at the subject of space as an element in space work. How does space influence the actor and how can the actor use it in order to hone his acting and stage presence? By examining these aspects we will explore basic concepts of action, emotion and intention, while trying to produce spontaneous and individual expression ability

Acting

Lecturer: Haim Abramsky

Semester: annual
THURS. 10:00-13:30
Credits: 3

Choreographic Spaces

Lecturer: May Zarhy

What does physical creativity that is not associated with any dance technique look like? How can we cultivate an awareness of our movement intelligence? These questions will guide us as we explore the relevant tools that emerge for each student in relation to their individual work. We will examine how to approach the piece, possible modes of working, and what can constitute a relevant choreographic space for each student. The course combines physical practice based on improvisations with observation, conversation, and preparatory exercises.

Choreographic Spaces

Lecturer: May Zarhy

Semester: annual
TUE. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 3

A Different Place

Lecturer: Ada Rimon

In this course we will create a film in a different place.
Each student will use a place of his or her choice as a springboard for a short film.
Continuing the first year, we will encourage the students to use diverse techniques in order to achieve interesting associations. We will practice filming, editing, and emphasize film creation and production processes.

A Different Place

Lecturer: Ada Rimon

Semester: b
WED. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 1.5

Music

Lecturer: Marcelo Pilewsky

In the course, the students will learn various software and means for creating, recording and editing audio.
The classes combine guided work in a sound room with theoretical classes that introduce basic musical concepts and different composing techniques.
Throughout the course, students will be asked to analyze, edit, and compose music.

Music

Lecturer: Marcelo Pilewsky

Semester: annual
MON. 10:30-13:00
Credits: 2

Modernity, Modernism and Contemporary art

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

In the course we will examine the ideological and aesthetic textures of the "modern age" and the characteristics of Modernism. It will focus on schools and styles that have crystallized on the range between the intensity of visibility and the aspiration towards the sublime, with references to 20th century avant-garde and Postmodernists.

Modernity, Modernism and Contemporary art

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

Semester: annual
Semester A: WED. 14:00-16:00 Semester b: TUES. 11:00-13:00
Credits: 2

Cinematic Expression

Lecturer: Orna Levi

The course focuses on cinematic language, the history of the image’s evolution, and the style of leading contemporary film directors. In the course, we will watch excerpts from films in class. Students are required to watch the entire selected film during the week.

Cinematic Expression

Lecturer: Orna Levi

Semester: annual
SUN. 13:00-15:00
Credits: 2

Towards the Finale

Lecturer: Guy Gutman

A weekly session in which we will get to know each student's individual work processes and the interpersonal processes that will allow the Finale to take place as the concluding event of the learning process at SVT.
Teachers and guests will join the sessions occasionally and give presentations aimed at expanding the dialogue.

Towards the Finale

Lecturer: Guy Gutman

Semester: annual
WED. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 3

Writing

Lecturer: Yonatan Levy

Objective: imparting writing skills; developing the ability to understand text on its various layers; developing tools for writing for theatre; practicing various types of writing.
What is said and what is not said
Text and rhythm
The metaphysical power of phonetics
Text as action
The magical word
Epic poetry
Lyric poetry
Figure and speech
Drama writing

Writing

Lecturer: Yonatan Levy

Semester: annual
MON. 13:00-16:00
Credits: 3

Voice and Choir Class

Lecturer: Meirav Ben David

The course will include vocal work, individual and in a group, on several levels:

Unique practice based on the path of uncovering the voice, attention and awareness to sound.

Exploring singing styles from different traditions, languages, and voice production techniques.

Voice and movement improvisation, and working on repertoire in different interpretations in solo singing and choir work.

Voice and Choir Class

Lecturer: Meirav Ben David

Semester: annual
WED. 09:00-12:30
Credits: 2

The Reflexive Show – Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Dafna ben-shaul

The concept of “the reflexive performance” refers to art’s self-reflection through its own means – art that in different ways reflects and presents itself, speaks about itself, and through this circular movement examines the subject and the political and social world. There are distinct instances of reflexivity, like painters who paint themselves from painting, theater within the theater, and performance that exposes its mechanisms. But the reflexive performance is first and foremost a central dimension of thinking and action found in every artwork. The workshop will be devoted to tangible discussion of the fascinating discourse and key questions introduced by the reflexive performance: the complex connections between a narcissistic performative awareness and the myth of Narcissus and Echo, aesthetic games within thin boundaries, and the link between the self-reflexivity of art and the excess of the real. We will do this in the form of an assimilative joint in-depth discussion, reading, and practical seminar.

The Reflexive Show – Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Dafna ben-shaul

Semester: a
October 22th, 2019: 10:00-18:00 at SVT October 23th, 2019: 12:00-21:00 at SVT
Credits: 1.5

The Visual Orchestra

Lecturer: Gai Shref

Once a week we will meet, improvise, listen, delve into the sounds, open a space in time where we can reverberate, explore, try, make mistakes, find and lose. We will explore improvisation as the beginning of creation, as a place from which ideas can emerge, in which we can surprise ourselves and make room for the unknown. We will learn compositions and arrange them together. We will experience different approaches to intuitive musical creation and exercises that will open new directions for working with sound and ensemble. The course is open to students of all years who play, sing, or touch on music and sound in some form and are interested in playing and creating together.

The Visual Orchestra

Lecturer: Gai Shref

Semester: annual
TUES. 19:00-22:00
Credits: 3

Film as Material – Cinematic Thinking and the Fundamentals of Editing

Lecturer: Ofeq Shemer

In the course we will learn to work with the materials that films are made of. We will play and experiment with different approaches and techniques to achieve meaningful sequences. We will watch examples from various types of films, shoot and record raw footage of our own, and use existing raw footage (after all the world is full of it, it’ll be a waste not to). Premier editing software, which we will learn, will serve as our laboratory for exploring the endless possibilities of the screen based medium.
Throughout the course, we will experience how the editing process can surprise us and lead us to find new ideas.

Film as Material – Cinematic Thinking and the Fundamentals of Editing

Lecturer: Ofeq Shemer

Semester: annual
THURS. 13:30-16:30
Credits: 3

The Interdisciplinary Studio

Lecturer: Guy Gutman

The Interdisciplinary Studio is a meeting place for 2nd and 3rd year students.
The studio is aimed at setting in motion and accompanying creative processes in interdisciplinary projects that do not necessarily fall into specific medium categories. The studio will accompany the works from preliminary experimentations to the final stages of production. In the first part, we will practice some warm up exercises with an emphasis on research-based and experimental approach. Each student will then initiate a project he intends to explore and develop. Step by step, in a process of experimentation and reflection, we will expand and elaborate each project and touch upon fundamental questions of time, form, and meaning

The Interdisciplinary Studio

Lecturer: Guy Gutman

Semester: annual
THURS. 16:30-19:30
Credits: 3

Modern Performance

Lecturer: Nir Shaoluff

The course will focus on the central stylistic trends in the art of performance from the late 19th century to the present and their historical-cultural context. Among others, we will discuss some of the key questions that performance art explored on a conceptual and practical level, in the modern and postmodern era. Throughout the academic year, the students will be asked to complete theoretical and practical tasks. Assignments and full attendance are prerequisites for completing the course.

Modern Performance

Lecturer: Nir Shaoluff

Semester: annual
SUN 15:30-17:00
Credits: 1.5

Way of Representation and Modes of Reading

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

 The representation of the human figure will serve as the key to understanding visual syntax in its cultural, conceptual, and formal contexts. Drawing on the fundamental duality in visual art between recognition and vision, we will examine ways of seeing in the history of art as an organized observation that is part of a general world view and a device for shaping consciousness. In the course we will focus, among other things, on body, text and space in the art of the mythopoeic world and the Classical world, on the iterations of motifs and Classical themes in the Christian world until the Baroque, while addressing contemporary contexts.

 

Way of Representation and Modes of Reading

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

Semester: annual
TUES. 13:30-15:30
Credits: 2

Bodies in Space and Time: A theoretical introduction to contemporary movement in dance

Lecturer: Dr. Idit Suslik

The dancing body in contemporary dance is contemporary in its shape, quality and movement. In this course, we will look at the characteristics of this contemporariness, and how it crystallized out of the processes of examining, deconstructing and reformulating the language of dance, from the second half of the 20th century to today. This course will be based on analysis practices and concepts learned in the introduction course, and will continue the chronological arc presented in it. We will discuss physical models that formed during the second half of the 20th century: the ballet body (abstract and neoclassical ballet), the ordinary/quotidian body (postmodern dance), the anti-aesthetic body (Pina Bausch’s dance-theatre) and simply the body, without any adjectives (contemporary and conceptual dance). In this course, we will also focus on a number of central themes rooted in contemporary theories, concepts, and processes discussed in dance, cultural, and gender studies. These include physical multilingualism and choreographic flexibility; Movement dramaturgy; Queerization and theatricalization of dance language; Body politics and "otherness"; Shifts in choreographic paradigms and more.

Bodies in Space and Time: A theoretical introduction to contemporary movement in dance

Lecturer: Dr. Idit Suslik

Semester: a
THURS. 10:00-13:00
Credits: 2

Stage

Lecturer: Yonatan Levy

Course objective: developing a profound understanding of the elements of the stage action
Space (real; imagined)
Time (plot time – performance present – Ideaic eternity)
Action (stage action, ritualistic action)
Stage (audience-actor relationship, the stage as a temple, as an evolutionary cell)
Intention (the performer as a relay station for the audience)
Performer (actor; character; shaman; ambassador)
Text (with an emphasis on text as a stage action)
Drama (and its translation into stage language)
The multi-sensory experience (about synesthetic theatre)
The functions of theatre (mental catharsis/ social repair/ metaphysical affinity).

Stage

Lecturer: Yonatan Levy

Semester: annual
MON. 17:00-20:00
Credits: 3

Practical Performance Directing

Lecturer: Eyal Weiser

Throughout the year, we will explore in practice various performance models, with an emphasis on the examination of the architecture of performance and the elements that allow the performer to move steadily within the piece. We will explore the effect of the stage action and the type of relation formed between it and the audience via different directing practices, carry out the translation of abstract elements into concrete images, and apply work practices with a group of performers.

Practical Performance Directing

Lecturer: Eyal Weiser

Semester: annual
SUN. 13:00-16:00
Credits: 3

The story of reality

Lecturer: Nava Frenkel


What is the difference between the story the theater tells us, and the story that life tells us.
Why do we tend to believe to the second one more than the first? And how one can distort, process and work with this tendency.
In this lesson, we will detach into their elements such human tendencies, giving each factor its new place, on the way to artistic achievement.

The story of reality

Lecturer: Nava Frenkel

Semester: annual
MON. 09:00-12:00
Credits: 3

Contemporary Directing

Lecturer: Nava Frenkel

Throughout the course we will try to examine the range of action in non-dramatic theatre events: what is the range of action of the performer and the viewer and what is the range of the stage action. We will read texts, learn of various artists, view works, and mostly – experience different practices to construct a theatre event that is not based on a play.
We will do all this by getting to know the various ways in which performance, in its fluid definition that eludes conceptual permanence, permeated the various arts in the 20th century and transformed them. We will focus on theatre but also look at dance, music, cinema, visual art, and literature, as well as diverse theories, and try to understand their relevance to creating performance today.

Contemporary Directing

Lecturer: Nava Frenkel

Semester: annual
MON. 12:30-15:30
Credits: 3

Between Dance and Choreography

Lecturer: Tami Lebovits

Throughout the course, we will compile and break down the elements that define our movement. We will focus on the movement that originates in the skeleton, which has weight and is governed by gravitation. We will work with different situations in which a body can be – physical, voice, and image. We will walk as individuals and as a group in a field, whose basic concepts are form, time and space.

Between Dance and Choreography

Lecturer: Tami Lebovits

Semester: annual
WED. 09:00-12:00
Credits: 3

If All Alone than At Least in Motion – Beginners

Lecturer: Maya Levy

The course will explore the complexity and pleasure of the creative process through the prism of the world of movement.

The course combines physical studio work with exercises and assignment critiques on a weekly basis.

If All Alone than At Least in Motion – Beginners

Lecturer: Maya Levy

Semester: annual
Monday 09:00-12:00
Credits: 3.5

Contemporary Art and a Look Back

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

The course will focus on trends and processes in art since the late 20th century, prominent exhibitions and contemporary art events.
The selection of artists, works, etc. will take into account questions and issues introduced by the students. The course will shift between class presentations by the students to opening windows to chapters in the history of art.

Contemporary Art and a Look Back

Lecturer: Tzipi weizman

Semester: a
TUES: 16:00-18:00
Credits: 2.0